Active Neighbourhood Project Online Meetings

Manchester City Council is planning three online events (via Microsoft Teams) to hear your ideas about Levenshulme & Burnage Active Neighbourhood Project plans. The project proposes a trial of 25 road blocks / “modal filters” all around Levenshulme starting on 19 December 2020 and running for six months.

There are other possible elements to the project that have not been confirmed yet but the trial will only be for the road blocks / “modal filters”.

Three dates have been arranged for the public meeting, which will take place on: 

  • Monday 26 October 2020 from 6 pm – 7 pm
  • Thursday 29 October 2020 from 6 pm – 7 pm
  • Monday 2 November 2020 from 6 pm – 7 pm.

To take part, please register your details via: levyburnageproject@manchester.gov.uk stating your preferred date and time. 

Further information is available on the Project Website and on the LCA website HERE (including documents not available on the project website).

Manchester City Council and the Project Team has only announced these online events via Twitter. There is no information on either the council’s own website or the Project website.

The deadline for commenting on the Active Neighbourhood plans has been extended to Wednesday 4 November 2020.

Active Neighbourhood Update: Documents, Deadlines & Feedback

The LCA has requested all publicity material for the Levenshulme and Burnage Active Neighbourhood Project including in different languages. All material that is currently available can be downloaded below as PDF documents. There are instructions here on how to comment on the plans online, by email and by written questionnaire including deadlines that have now changed.

Be aware that all the maps in the printed materials are different and the deadline for comment has been extended by a week because of a mistake in the printed materials that have been distributed.

As of today (16 October 2020) only the questionnaire leaflet is available in any language apart from English. That language is Romanian.

UPDATE: Urdu version of the questionnaire leaflet added on 23 October 2020

UPDATE: Bengali version of the questionnaire leaflet added on 22 October 2020

UPDATE: Arabic version of questionnaire leaflet added on 19 October 2020.

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Active Neighbourhood Feedback Deadline Extended

The Levenshulme and Burnage Active Neighbourhood deadline for feedback and comment has been extended to Wednesday 4th November 2020.

You can find out more about what the plans are and how to give feedback HERE.

Many people in our community still haven’t received notification of these plans. The LCA had written to the Project Team requesting an extension to the deadline so an extra week is helpful although we still don’t think that is sufficient. In the meantime you can download the booklet and poster by following the link above.

We have also requested a PDF copy of the Active Neighbourhood questionnaire form to make available to people but so far this has been refused and we have been told people must go to either Arcadia Library and Leisure Centre or Burnage Library to collect a paper copy of the booklets and forms. Publicity material has also been requested in other languages for distribution but so far this has not been provided and does not seem to be available yet.

Active Neighbourhood Booklet, Poster and Feedback

Manchester City Council has now released an information booklet and poster on the revised plans for the Levenshulme and Burnage Active Neighbourhood project. You can download PDFs of both below.

You can also request paper copies of the booklet and information in other languages by emailing: levyburnageproject@manchester.gov.uk Copies will be made available in the Arcadia Library and Leisure Centre and hopefully at other locations in the area (to be confirmed).

The website for feedback is available HERE. Comments must be received by Wednesday 28 October 2020.

Letters have been sent to schools this week and should be received by all residents and businesses across the project area in Levenshulme and Burnage next week. This will allow about two weeks to comment on all four response areas and the 25 proposed individual road blocks / “modal filters”.

The MCC website currently says:

Comments on the trial (Phase 1) area will need to reach us by 28 October to be accepted, but all feedback given during the trial period (19 December 2020 to19 June 2021) will be reviewed before any final decisions are made. Feedback on problem areas and what the issues are in Cringle Park (Phase 2) are also welcomed, and can influence the trial, which is currently due to start early in 2021. These will need to be received by 21 December 2020.

MCC LBAN feedback dates

NOTE: Information on the council’s website has been changing every few days in the past two weeks probably partly due to the project losing its second Project Manager after the new plans were released on Monday 02 October. The LCA will continue to monitor whatever is released and make sense of the process.

We will also request an extension to the feedback deadline as two weeks seems unreasonably short period for people to understand the complex proposals and comment on the scheme especially as no formal notification of the engagement process and new plans has been sent to residents or businesses yet.

Active Neighbourhood Dates

Active Neighbourhood online feedback deadline 28 October 2020

Road Blocks / “Modal Filters” trial will run from 19 December 2020 to 19 June 2021

UPDATE: The Manchester City Council website did not mention any dates initially, then within the last week the dates were added. It seemed the dates had been removed but actually an extra page of text was added to the MCC website on 7th October HERE that still includes the dates.

A contact email for the project has also now been added: levyburnageproject@manchester.gov.uk


Manchester City Council still hasn’t actually informed anybody about the new plans and consultation on the proposed Active Neighbourhood but it has set a deadline for feedback.

Letters were promised to all residents, businesses, schools and community groups but so far nothing has been sent out. We were also promised a phone line to make comments and that has not yet been provided and an email address which so far doesn’t seem to exist. The new website for commenting is only available in English. No posters or information have been put up in the area informing people about the online consultation. So the only way to comment on a scheme the council hasn’t officially told anyone about yet is online HERE.

Regardless of not telling anyone about the new plans apart from a tweet from our MP, Afzal Khan, that was shared by some councillors the council has now provided a deadline when the online consultation will end on 28th October. So we won’t be able to comment on a plan the council hasn’t told anybody about after 28th October.

There are now 25 individual road blocks / “modal filters” on the new plans in Phase 1 covering Levenshulme. The Commonplace website says temporary crossings and traffic calming will be included the trial but there is no evidence of these on the new plans although part of the online consultation invites comments about these. A summary of the new plans is available HERE.

Note that the project has now been renamed “Levenshulme and Burnage Active Neighbourhood”. When it was called Levenshulme Bee Network it included part of Burnage. Now it is called Levenshulme and Burnage Active Neighbourhood that part of Burnage is now excluded from the trial starting in December.

The part of Burnage included in the project is now identified as “Phase 2”. The project claims it will reduce traffic in the area but the council says the Burnage area has now been excluded from the December trial “…because of the density of schools in the Cringle Brook (Phase 2) area, and issues with traffic congestion…” which is a little confusing.

The Phase 2 area covers part of Burnage Ward and was identified previously as “Cringle Park Area”, not “Cringle Brook” as the council website says. The road blocks / “modal filters” that were in the previous plans in what is now Phase 2 have been removed from the new plans and you are invited to propose ideas for Burnage Ward. No timeline is available for Phase 2.

The project was paused in the summer to allow for further and more extensive engagement with the community. The July statement from Levenshulme councillors is below for reference. Since then a new Project Manager was appointed by the council, new plans developed that seem to be almost identical to the original plans despite them receiving considerable opposition from our community and the Burnage section of the project has been removed from the trial despite Sustrans (who developed the plans for the council) saying the whole scheme needed to be trialled or it wouldn’t work.

The whole thing is ever more confusing but further updates will be provided as things develop to try and keep people informed.

New Active Neighbourhood Plans released

The revised plans for the Levenshulme and Burnage Active Neighbourhood have been released. Full information is available on the new website HERE.

The project has now been split into two with Phase 1 covering Levenshulme and Phase 2 covering Burnage. A trial of road blocks / “modal filters” will start in December 2020 and last for a minimum of six months.

Note that a “modal filter” is the name given to something that blocks the road to vehicular traffic but still allows access through for pedestrians and cyclists (and presumably mopeds and motorbikes).

Manchester City Council says:

We now have a plan for the future direction of the project, and have decided to tackle it in two phases. We would like your feedback on some of the measures which we are going to trial (Phase 1). The trial measures will start to be put in place from December (during school holidays).This is also a great way for the scheme to be seen in action, tested and analysed, so it can be tweaked or changed where required but also allow peoples habits to change and through traffic to re-route.

Because of the density of schools in the Cringle Park (Phase 2) area, and issues with traffic congestion, we are continuing to seek opinions from local residents, businesses and schools on what measures are needed and where before they are trialled.

We hope to commence the trial in the Festive season break in December and will last a minimum of 6 months. The final designs for the Active neighbourhood will be drawn up based on the results of the consultation and implemented within 18 months should the funding application be successful.

MCC Active Neighbourhood Plans

The Phase 1 trial area excludes Burnage. No date has been suggested yet for Phase 2 in Burnage. The Phase 1 / Phase 2 split has been done based on political Wards, not the Park Area cells the Project has identified which is why the Henderson Street road block / “modal filter” is included in Phase 1.

The Levenshulme Phase 1 trial identifies 25 road blocks / “modal filters” outlined on the map below. The revised plans are not very different to the original plans. We will look at them in detail and post further information once we have worked out what differences there are.

The Phase 1 trial is still primarily for road blocks / “modal filters”. The council is also asking for feedback on where temporary crossings and traffic calming could be located as part of its Phase 1 consultation. The council says:

The trial includes a number of temporary crossing points and traffic calming measures to provide immediate benefits on routes that have been raised through previous consultation. [ * ]

We understand from previous feedback that traffic volume and speeds make certain streets hard to cross. We’d like you to tell us where you feel crossing points or traffic calming may help day to day life and make getting around safer and easier.

Further community feedback on the locations of these is welcomed, so that a final Trial Plan can be developed. The trial plan has a degree of flexibility once live, but we need to allow the trial to bed in to understand how habits change and the trial is being used. 

MCC Active Neighbourhood crossings and traffic calming

[ * NOTE: there is no evidence of this on the map for the Phase 1 trial]

Give your feedback

Phase 1 feedback (Levenshulme) can only be made by responding to the 25 locations identified by the council. You can, however, drop a pin on the map for the Phase 2 feedback (Burnage) to identify a location and comment where you think an intervention could or should be located.

Phase 1 (Levenshulme)

You can comment HERE on the proposed road blocks / “modal filters”.

You can comment HERE on where you think crossings and traffic calming should go.

You can comment HERE on the whole scheme.

Phase 2 (Burnage)

You can comment HERE on what measures you think should be included in Phase 2.

How has the Project Changed?

There are a number of differences between the May proposals and the new proposals released in September. A summary is provided here for reference.

Levenshulme and Burnage Active Neighbourhood Project v1 and v2 Comparison

( RB/MF = Road Block / “Modal Filter” )

 Version 1May 2020Version 2 Sept 2020v2 Map ref.Changes
Green Bank Park Area    
Longden RoadRB/MFRB/MF1Same as v1
Armitage AvenueRB/MFRB/MF2Same as v1
Mayford RoadRB/MFRB/MF3Same as v1
Guildford Road / Audley RoadRB/MF (Diagonal)RB/MF4Moved along Guildford Road and now a standard RB/MF
Stovell Avenue / Northmoor RoadBus Gate  Bus Gate removed
Manor Road 1 (between Barlow Road and Rushmere Avenue)RB/MFRB/MF5Same as v1
Manor Road 2 RB/MF6Moved to where a new crossing was proposed originally
Caremine Avenue RB/MF7EXTRA RB/MF
Portville RoadRB/MFRB/MF8Same as v1
Dunstable StreetRB/MFRB/MF9Same as v1
Barlow RoadRB/MFRB/MF10Same as v1
Cardus Street (North) RB/MF11EXTRA RB/MF and road changed to two-way traffic
Chapel Street Park Area    
Cardus Street (South) RB/MF12Same as v1
Chapel Street (West)RB/MFRB/MF13Same as v1
Chapel Street (East)RB/MFRB/MF14Same as v1
Chapel Street / Stockport Road junction   Changed to two-way traffic
Atlas PlaceRB/MFRB/MF15Same as v1
Delamere Road (West)RB/MFRB/MF16Same as v1 with road changed from one-way to two-way traffic
Delamere Road / Gordon AvenueRB/MF (Diagonal)RB/MF17Same as v1
Crayfield RoadRB/MFRB/MF18Same as v1
Marley RoadRB/MFRB/MF19Same as v1
Dorset RoadRB/MFRB/MF20Same as v1
Molyneux RoadRB/MFRB/MF21Same as v1
Broom Lane / Stockport Road junction   Changed to allow left and right turning
Cromwell Grove / Stockport Road junction   Changed to allow left and right turning
West Point Gardens Area    
Osborne RoadRB/MFRB/MF22Same as v1
Victoria RoadRB/MF (Diagonal)RB/MF23Changed from diagonal RB/MF to standard and moved to junction with Albert Road
Buckhurst RoadRB/MFRB/MF24Same as v1
Green DriveRB/MF  RB/MF removed (private road)
Lytham RoadRB/MF  RB/MF removed and road left as it is now
Cringle Park Area (Burnage)    
Fortuna Grove / Monica GroveRB/MF (Diagonal)  Further consultation
Burnage Hall RoadRB/MF  Further consultation
Slade Lane (near Linden Park)Bus Gate  Further consultation
Errwood Road (near Alma Park Primary)Bus Gate  Further consultation
Clare RoadRB/MF  Further consultation
Alma RoadRB/MF  Further consultation
Henderson StreetRB/MFRB/MF25Same as v1
L&B Active Neighbourhood Version Comparison (May plan v1 / September Plan v2)

Levenshulme & Burnage Active Neighbourhood Phase 1 Map

You can view the map online HERE or download a PDF version below.

World Car Free Day 2020

Today is World Car Free Day 2020.

Car Free Day encourages motorists to give up their cars for a day. Organised events are sometimes held but the general aim is to encourage walking and cycling and use of public transport instead of cars.

The European Union has since 2001 extended this idea to European Mobility Week culminating in the World Car Free Day. The UK has two cities participating (London and Nottingham) compared to 540 locations in Turkey, 534 in Austria and 530 in Spain.

Manchester City Council is currently developing plans for an Active Neighbourhood in Levenshulme and Burnage to encourage and make walking and cycling easier. The project was paused in the summer but revised plans and letters with information to residents and businesses are expected soon.

The first proposal of the Levenshulme and Burnage Active Neighbourhood is to trial a “Low Traffic Neighbourhood (LTN)” in the form of multiple road blocks to vehicles (referred to as “modal filters”). These would restrict routes for vehicles whilst allowing pedestrians and cyclists free access. 32 filters were initially proposed in May 2020 but the revised plans are likely to change from that. Keep an eye out for the letters and information.

The Levenshulme Community Manifesto developed by the LCA includes a section on transport.

Levenshulme Station Improvements

Network Rail will start work on improvements to Levenshulme Station this month.

Work is scheduled to start on Monday 28th September and finish on Friday 13th November 2020 with work taking place between 7am and 5pm.

Flooding in the subway under the platforms has been a problem for many years. The inside of the station will be upgraded with new lighting, flooring (a new concrete and resin floor), a new ceiling, cladding and painting.

The work will involve a temporary closure of the subway tunnel so the old Albert Road entrance will be reinstated permanently. This will provide access to platform 1 only until the subway reopens. Access to platform 2 will continue from the existing entrance. Access to both platforms will be available from either side of the tracks once work is completed.

Apart from the reopening of the Albert Road station entrance no other improvements will be done as part of these improvements. Friends of Levenshulme Station continue to campaign for access improvements alongside other local groups such as the LCA, local councillors (Dzidra Noor, Basat Sheikh and Bernard Stone) and our MP (Afzal Khan).

Image courtesy of Conrad Bower / themeteor.org

GM Road Charging Clean Air Plan

Government has directed Greater Manchester to introduce a ‘category C’ charging Clean Air Zone. This would cover local roads across the whole of Greater Manchester from spring 2022, operating 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The intention is to to bring nitrogen dioxide (NO2) levels on local roads within legal limits as soon as possible.

The proposed Clean Air Zone aims to:

  • Bring NO2 emissions within legal limits as soon as possible and by 2024 at the latest.
  • Discourage polluting commercial vehicles from travelling on local roads in Greater Manchester.
  • Encourage businesses to switch to cleaner, low- or zero-emission vehicles.

The proposed Zone would cover all local roads across Greater Manchester. It would not include motorways and some main trunk roads managed by Highways England. The exact boundary is being developed by looking in detail at the local road network and using public feedback. See the Greater Manchester boundary, and the stretches of roads which have been identified as breaching legal NO2 limits without action, on our MappingGM page.

The most polluting commercial vehicles would pay a daily charge to travel on local roads in the Zone. Private cars, motorbikes and mopeds would not be charged. The Zone would be enforced by a network of Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) cameras.

The following are proposed daily charges for the non-compliant commercial vehicles:

  • Buses, coaches and Heavy Good Vehicles (HGV) – £60 (from spring 2022)
  • Taxis and private hire vehicles – £7.50 (from spring 2022)
  • Light Goods Vehicles (LGV) such as vans and minibuses – £10 (temporary exemption until 2023)

If the daily charge for a non-compliant vehicle isn’t paid, a Penalty Charge Notice (PCN) of £120 would be issued, in addition to the unpaid daily charge.

The 10 Greater Manchester local authorities have worked together to consider a wide range of measures to tackle air pollution, alongside a Clean Air Zone. Together, these form the Greater Manchester Clean Air Plan.

The costs of introducing a Clean Air Zone are covered by government. 

Further information including proposed charges are available HERE.

An eight week consultation will be launched in October 2020.

Manchester Urban Observatory Data For Our Active Neighbourhood

Levenshulme Community Association is grateful to Manchester Urban Observatory for this article following contact with Dr Jen O’Brien and Prof. James Evans. We will continue to provide information and updates as they become available to help everyone understand the Active Neighbourhood proposals and be involved in the process to get the best we can for our community. This fits with several of the aims of the Levenshulme Community Manifesto.

Manchester Urban Observatory and the Levenshulme Active Neighbourhood – improving decision making with data

The Manchester Urban Observatory is part of a network of 6 Urban Observatories across England which are developing a new approach to the monitoring and understanding of cities. Our goal is to ensure future decision making is informed by a detailed appreciation of the consequences and complexity of urbanisation. The Manchester Urban Observatory is based at the University of Manchester, bringing together expertise from across the humanities, environmental sciences and health. Our role is to work with local partners to support the better planning and delivery of urban development. We operate entirely independent, with our funding secured through the UK Collaboratorium on Infrastructure and Cities.

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Cycle To Work (or anywhere) Day 2020

Back for another year! This year is a little different of course. It’s 2020, and we’re all embracing the unknown. Rather than swapping your commute, simply ride anywhere, for any reason and with anyone. It’s still Cycle to Work Day, but with a new twist!

Whether you’ve still got a commute or not, you can get involved. This year, joining in with Cycle to Work Day means trying something different. Whether it’s early morning exercise, leaving the car on the drive as you nip to the shops, or going for a socially distanced cycle with friends and family. You might even be able to squeeze in a quick lunch-break ride. Whatever journey you’re planning on Thursday 6th August 2020, get on your bike!  

Full information is available HERE

Bee Network July Webinars

Levenshulme Bee Network held a series of Webinars at the weekend (4-5th July 2020). You can watch these below or on the LBN website HERE

There were four Webinars, one for each “Park Area” Levenshulme Bee Network has identified for its project. LBN says the purpose of the Webinars was:

“…to talk through the design rationale for the trials, a bit of background on the project engagement and how the funding works for the scheme. It was also a chance for residents of each area to ask questions about the proposed filters and the wider project.”

Levenshulme Bee Network Webinars, 4-5th July 2020

There were questions submitted in advance and also viewers could type questions in live during the Webinars.

LBN Chapel Street Park Area Webinar

LBN Greenbank Park Area Webinar

LBN Cringle Park Area Webinar

LBN West Point Gardens Park Area Webinar

MEN Article On Levenshulme Bee Network Proposals

An article in the Manchester Evening News today (28 June 2020) raises concerns about the Levenshulme Bee Network proposals. This follows the announcement by Manchester City Council this week of a “pause” to the proposed trial that was due to start in July to allow for further consultation.

There is an extract below and you can read the full article HERE

“When plans to create a ‘fully-filtered’ neighbourhood through Levenshulme were first announced, there was enthusiasm from residents for how the area could soon become the most cycle-friendly place in Greater Manchester.

But as the impact of the plans is becoming clearer, disquiet is growing in the south Manchester suburb.

The Levenshulme Bee Network’s plans would see roads blocked to traffic by ‘modal filters’ that favour cyclists, school streets – which would restrict traffic during particular hours to make it safer for families to walk – and bus gates, stretches of road that are only open to buses, black cabs and push bikes.

The scheme would impact over 40 roads, junctions and schools.

But, following the publication of a map showing the locations of the proposed changes, some locals are concerned that traffic will be pushed into already busy roads to the benefit of quieter streets.

Others have complained that it could impact local businesses – and that the area’s elderly and non-English speaking residents have been shut out of what is supposed to be a community led project.”

Council Pauses Levenshulme Bee Network Project

Following intervention by Manchester City Council and local councillors the Levenshulme Bee Network project has been “paused” to allow for further consultation.

This follows considerable concern across our community after the Levenshulme Bee Network released proposals for a trial of 29 vehicle road blocks (referred to as “modal filters”) across the area.

The maps released by Levenshulme Bee Network at the end of May also included other things such as a series of new and improved pedestrian crossings, bike racks, a “parklet” and several bus gates blocking the road to other vehicles but these are not part of the trial that was due to start in July.

Levenshulme Community Association will continue to ensure our community is informed and involved as further information is available about what this means including how people can contribute and have their voices heard.

Levenshulme Bee Network Through Routes

A trial will start in July 2020 of some of the Levenshulme Bee Network changes to our roads. 29 locations will have changes with roads being blocked to vehicle traffic. But which roads will not be affected?

Residents have made their own maps to help people see which routes will not have road blocks to vehicles on them starting in July (referred to as “modal filters”). These roads are likely to have significantly increased traffic.

The reason these have been done is the Levenshulme Bee Network maps do not show which roads traffic in the area will be redirected onto and can be used as “through routes”. They have been done by residents to help everyone understand the impact of the project and so people can plan how to change the routes they take from July.

Roads that traffic will be diverted onto:

  • Albert Road
  • Barlow Road
  • Broom Lane 
  • Cromwell Grove 
  • Crossley Road
  • Grangethorpe Drive 
  • Hemmons Road
  • Kingsway 
  • Matthews Lane 
  • Moseley Road
  • Mount Road
  • Slade Lane (north of Albert Road)

See below for the maps. Further information on the July changes can be found HERE

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Levenshulme Station Improvements

An update on improvements to Levenshulme Station from Afzal Khan MP

Thanks to pressure from Afzal Khan MP together with Levenshulme’s Labour councillors and local campaigners, there is now a start date for work to improve Levenshulme station. For many years, passengers have been subjected to flooding, poor lighting and an overall lack of cleanliness at the station, and it is hoped this work will dramatically improve passenger experience.

Earlier this year, local MP Afzal Khan visited Levenshulme station with representatives from Northern and Network Rail and walked through planned upgrades. Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, the upgrades due to start in Spring 2020 were significantly delayed. This week, Network Rail informed Mr Khan that works are now due to start in September 2020.

Afzal Khan MP said,

“I am delighted to have a new start date for the work. Levenshulme Station is a critical transport hub for the local community. Community groups, councillors and I have been campaigning for station improvements for many years and I am pleased that our hard work is starting to pay off.”

He continued,

“Despite this good news, I will be continuing to campaign to make our station accessible for all Levenshulme residents. It was incredibly disappointing that we were not awarded any Access for All funding from the Department for Transport in the last round of bidding, despite submitting a strong bid backed by a great community campaign. The truth is that the Tory Government has not allocated enough money for this work, and at the current rate it will take over fifty years for all of Greater Manchester’s stations to be made accessible.”

Cllr Bernard Stone said,

“Levenshulme’s Labour councillors – Dzidra [Noor] , Basat [Sheikh] and I – welcome the long overdue work being undertaken at Levenshulme Station. Local residents and Councillors have been pushing for this to be done for a long time. It is good to now have a definite start date.”

Videochats About Road Changes

Levenshulme Bee Network is holding a series of “webinars” on the “Filtered Neighbourhood Trials” starting in July 2020. These involve blocking off roads to motorised vehicles in 29 locations across the area. Pedestrians and cyclists can still access these roads through the “filters”.

Please see the LCA post HERE for full details including maps.

The Webinars will be held:

Saturday 4th July

  • 11.00-12.30 Chapel Street Park Area
  • 13.00-14.30 Cringle Park Area

Sunday 5th July

  • 11.00-12.30 Greenbank Park Area
  • 13.00-14.30 West Point Gardens Area

To participate in a webinar send and email to hello@levenshulmebeenetwork.co.uk quoting the Park Area you are interested in.

UPDATE

You can now register directly using the links below. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Topic: Chapel Street Park Area Webinar + Q&A

  • When: Jul 4, 2020 11:00 AM
  • Register in advance for this webinar: HERE

Topic: Cringle Park Area Webinar + Q&A

  • When: Jul 4, 2020 01:00 PM
  • Register in advance for this webinar HERE

Topic: Greenbank Park Area Webinar + Q&A

  • When: Jul 5, 2020 11:00 AM
  • Register in advance for this webinar HERE

Topic: West Point Gardens Park Area Webinar + Q&A

  • When: Jul 5, 2020 01:00 PM
  • Register in advance for this webinar HERE

ANOTHER UPDATE

Q & A

If you would like to send in any questions for the Q and A – we are using the links below to collect questions so people can ask and then upvote the most popular ones to be answered in the sessions.

Submit Cringle Field Park Webinar questions HERE

Submit Chapel Street Park Webinar questions HERE 

Submit Greenbank Park Webinar questions HERE

Submit West Point Gardens Webinar questions HERE

If you would like to get in touch about anything please email trial@levenshulmebeenetwork.co.uk

Dramatic Road Changes From July 2020

Levenshulme and surrounding areas are about to experience major changes to our roads.

This is the first stage of the changes being imposed by the Levenshulme Bee Network Project. This is a new idea to create a “Filtered Neighbourhood” and to make walking and cycling easier by blocking off roads and restricting access for motorised vehicles. A whole host of other ideas are planned as well. This is just the start.

Travelling around Levenshulme and getting to and from the area will never be the same again.

12 June update

Please note that the information below was correct when it was posted. However, Levenshulme Bee Network has now changed the description on its website about the July 2020 changes. There is nothing on their website to indicate this has been changed.

Original text when the announcement was made:

“In the next few weeks we will be installing 29 temporary modal filters throughout the neighbourhood.

These will remain in place for a minimum of six months whilst we consult and tweak the filters with your feedback. They will then become permanent within 18 months.”

New text as of 12 June 2020:

“In the next few weeks we will be installing 29 temporary modal filters throughout the neighbourhood.

The trial will be undertaken using an experimental traffic regulation order which means that we can make changes following your feedback and monitor the impact for the first 6 months before the Council decides if the filters will be implemented on a permanent basis. All feedback from residents and monitoring of traffic, pedestrian and cycling levels as well as air quality levels will be considered before any of the filters are installed permanently.”

See below for details of the roads that will be affected, what will be done in July and maps including these changes.

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TfGM Future Travel Survey

Transport for Greater Manchester is doing a survey on future travel arrangements. TfGM say:

“The coronavirus has affected all our lives, from how we work and shop to how we travel. Getting our future transport network right will be central to getting more and more of Greater Manchester moving again. We want to keep you safe, support our economy and ensure our recovery is sustainable, so we can cut congestion and have cleaner air.”

You can do the survey HERE (it takes about 15 minutes)

The survey deadline is 8am Monday 1 June 2020

New TfGM Travel Advice

Transport for Greater Manchester has released new travel advice.

“Coronavirus has affected all aspects of our lives, including how we travel. 

This week government published a new guide to help people understand if and when they should travel – and how to do so safely during the coronavirus outbreak in England. 

The guide gives advice for walking, cycling, driving and travelling on public transport. 

The Government’s latest advice is that you should stay at home as much as possible, work from home if you can, stay local and only travel if it is necessary. 

If you do have to travel, walk, cycle or drive if you can and continue to avoid public transport unless you have no other option – leave it for those with no alternative. 

Increased walking and cycling will be essential to reduce pressure on our roads and public transport networks so please do consider this as one of your options. 

If you have to use public transport, please help to keep yourself and others safe:

  • Wear a face covering when you travel
  • Keep a distance of 2 metres where possible on platforms, stops, stations and interchanges and while travelling on trams, trains and buses
  • Wash or sanitise your hands regularly – including before and after you travel – and carry a hand sanitiser with you if possible
  • Pay using contactless, apps or buy your tickets online if you can

Please be aware that a face covering is not the same as a surgical mask or respirator, these should be left for health and social care staff and other key workers who need them to protect against risks in their workplace. 

A cloth face covering should cover your mouth and nose while allowing you to breathe comfortably. You should wash your hands or use hand sanitiser before putting it on and after taking it off. Government has published an online guide on wearing and making a face covering

Where possible people using public transport should also look to travel outside of peak times in the morning and evening and leave extra time for journeys. Also make sure you check timetables before you travel. 

If you are an employer or employee about to return to a workplace which has recently reopened, TfGM has produced a factsheet with further information to support you.

For the latest updates on services, timetables and safety advice, visit the TfGM coronavirus webpage.

Please share this message with your friends, family and colleagues, and we’ll continue to keep you updated. 

Stay safe,

Stephen Rhodes 

Customer Director 

Transport for Greater Manchester 

See the advice on the TfGM website HERE

How to maintain your car when not driving regularly

How to maintain your car when not driving regularly

With the country in the middle of the coronavirus (COVID-19), you may not be able to get out and about in the car as much as you’re used to. Many will be wondering what to do with your car if you aren’t driving it on a regular basis.

What to do with your car, and how to maintain it, depends on how long you’re leaving your car idle. For example, you may be using it to top up on food and supplies or driving it if you work in an essential job or industry. But for many, you may not need or want to use your car for a lot longer, maybe even months.

Remember that even if you’re not using it, you’ll still have to insure your car unless you make a Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN). You can only make a SORN if the car’s being kept off the road.

Here are some commonly asked questions and answers:

How long can you leave a car without starting?

How long you leave a car without starting can depend on the condition of your car’s 12-volt battery. Most modern cars with a fairly healthy battery should last at least 2 weeks, without needing to be started up to re-charge the battery. If there’s any doubt about the condition of the battery, start it once a week just to be safe.

What happens if you don’t drive a car for a long time?

Even if you haven’t driven for a while your car should be fine. If it’s been regularly started and run for 15-minute periods, the battery should work. The tyre pressures should be checked and adjusted before driving. The brakes may have some corrosion on them, especially if the car was wet when it was parked up. Drive carefully and test the brakes as soon as possible. Make sure you use your brakes for the first few miles to clean off any corrosion.

Is it bad to leave a car unused?

Cars are made to be driven but with good care it should be fine. If it’s left unused follow our guidelines.

Can I leave my car parked for a month?

Yes, but it’s best to follow these guidelines to keep the car ready to drive.

How long can a car sit before the battery dies?

As we’ve said above, there are many factors that can affect this. The age of the battery, how the car’s been used and the temperature all affect the performance of a battery. If you follow our guidelines your battery shouldn’t let you down.

What if my MOT expires?

The government has announced a 6-month exemption from the MOT test, although your car must be kept in a roadworthy condition.

Here are a few simple tips on how to keep your car lasting longer and ready to use when you need it again.

Leaving your car parked for up to a month
  • Fuel – Before parking your car up for a long period, it’s a good idea to top up with fuel. Not only will this help with other measures, but a full tank doesn’t attract condensation, which could cause issues if allowed to build up over time.

  • Battery maintenance – If you can, connect your car’s battery to a mains-powered battery maintainer. If you can’t, start the engine once a week and allow it to run for about 15 minutes. This will re-charge the battery and help keep the engine in good condition. It’s important to allow the engine to run for this long so the battery can charge properly. In the case of petrol engine cars, it also helps to prevent engines from flooding with fuel. Never leave your car unattended with the engine running.

  • Brakes – Sometimes when a car’s parked up for a long period with the parking brake on, the brakes can seize. To prevent this it’s good practice to release the parking brake and move the vehicle a short distance back and forth, at the same time as running the engine. You shouldn’t leave the parking brake off unless the vehicle is on private land with the wheels securely chocked.

  • Electric vehicles – EVs and hybrid vehicles have 12-volt batteries, the same as conventional cars. However, they charge differently. Pressing the start button, so the ready light comes on, will operate the charging system. Doing this for 10 minutes once a week should keep the 12-volt battery topped up. Some electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles can maintain their 12-volt batteries if they’re plugged in to the mains charger. Check your vehicle handbook for details on this.

  • Garages – Don’t run a car engine inside a household garage as the exhaust fumes can be toxic. If you keep your car in a garage, pull it out onto the drive to run the engine to charge the battery.

  • Tyres – Before driving the car after a long period parked up, check all of the tyre pressures and inflate if needed.

Full advice from The AA is available HERE

Driving and MOTs extensions

Link to the new DVLA guidance HERE

Published 25 March 2020

From 30 March 2020, MOT due dates for cars, motorcycles and light vans will be extended by 6 months. This is being done to help prevent the spread of coronavirus.

There’s separate guidance about what to do if your MOT due date is up to and including 29 March 2020.

There are different temporary rules for MOT tests for lorries, buses and trailers.

What you need to do

You do not need to do anything to extend your vehicle’s MOT expiry date if it’s on or after 30 March 2020. However, you must keep your vehicle safe to drive.

Your vehicle will be automatically given a 6-month MOT exemption. This will extend your current MOT expiry date by 6 months.

ExampleYour vehicle’s MOT was due to expire on 3 April 2020.

This will automatically be extended to 3 October 2020. You will need to get your MOT by this date.

You can check your MOT history to see when you have been issued an exemption. It will not be updated straight away, so keep checking back if your new due date MOT is not yet showing.

You will not get a paper exemption certificate.

If your vehicle tax is due, you can tax your vehicle as soon as your MOT due date has been updated.

If your vehicle’s first MOT is due

Your vehicle will be automatically given a 6-month MOT exemption from the date its first MOT was due.

If your first MOT was due before 30 March 2020 and your vehicle did not pass

Your vehicle will not get an extension to its MOT due date.

Your vehicle will need to pass an MOT before you can drive it again.

The government is allowing MOT centres and garages to remain open. So you can still get an MOT if you need your vehicle:

  • to shop for basic necessities, for example food and medicine, which must be as infrequent as possible
  • for any medical need, or to provide care or to help a vulnerable person
  • to travel to and from work, but only where this absolutely cannot be done from home

Read the full guidance on staying at home and away from others.

Keep your vehicle safe to drive

You must make sure your vehicle is safe to drive (‘roadworthy’). It can be unsafe even if your MOT expiry date has been extended.

Find out how to check your vehicle is safe and read the rules about vehicle maintenance, safety and security.

You can be fined up to £2,500, be banned from driving and get 3 penalty points for driving a vehicle in a dangerous condition.

You should still take your vehicle to be repaired at the nearest open garage. The government is allowing them to remain open.

Levenshulme Station Improvements

March 13 report from Afzal Khan on improvements to Levenshulme Station.

“Last week I attended a site visit to Levensulme Station with representatives from Northern and Network Rail, as well as one of the local councillors. In the past few years there has been a number of issues at the station including flooding, poor lighting, and overall lack of cleanliness. I was therefore delighted to be walked through the improvements that are due to take place in the Spring. 

These include:

  • Removing existing wall and ceiling cladding in the subway, including gutters and existing redundant and temporary light fittings
  • Deep clean and refurbish newly exposed glazed brick subway walls and fittings
  • Replace existing tiled subway floor with new concrete floor slab and resin floor finish
  • Install new lighting in the subway
  • Install new drainage channels along both subway walls to accept discharge from gutter downpipes, and any surface water from the subway floor
  • Remove existing ceilings above station entrance and platform stairs and install new boarded ceilings

While I was incredibly disappointed that Levenshulme Station wasn’t awarded any Access for All funding from the Department for Transport, despite submitting a very strong bid backed by a great community campaign, I will be continuing to explore other funding options to improve accessibility at this busy station.

However, I am very pleased that stations elsewhere in Manchester Gorton have been awarded Access for All funding. Work will start soon at Belle Vue and Ryder Brow railway stations to improve safety and accessibility.”

Fallowfield Loop £4.9m investment

£4.9 million investment announced for the Fallowfield Loop

Fallowfield Loop enhancements (£4.9m)
This scheme will create a 24/7, orbital cycle and walking route connecting Chorlton to Gorton. It is proposed to introduce new lighting and to improve access points along this 12km, traffic-free cycle path.

More information available HERE

https://www.manchester.gov.uk/news/article/8328/manchester_announces_new_walking_and_cycling_schemes_as_mayor_and_commissioner_call_on_government_for_long-term_funding_commitment